Revenge Porn

What Is Revenge Porn?

Sexually explicit photos/videos/etc. that is publicly distributed online without the consent of the pictured/videoed individual.
  • Sometimes called non-consensual pornography or cyber exploitation.
  • In addition to intimate images, perpetrators can post other identifying information to accompany the image or video, including the victim’s name, links to social media accounts, email addresses, physical addresses of their place of employment and residence, phone numbers, and even social security information.
A form of sexual abuse that involves the distribution of nude/sexually explicit photos and/or videos of an individual without their consent.
  • Sometimes posted by a scorned ex-lover or friend in order to seek revenge after a relationship has gone sour.
  • Could be shared because the person thought it was funny, he or she enjoyed the pictures and thought others would too, or because of pride/gloating.
These sexually explicit images quickly make their way to the attention of the victim’s family members, friends, co-workers, classmates, colleagues, and employers.
  • Victims are routinely threatened, stalked, and tormented.
  • They have difficulty finding work and often get fired from or are forced to leave their current jobs or schools because of the severity of the harassment.
Materials can be stolen by ex-lovers, ex-spouses, associates, or even complete strangers through hacking, theft of a cell phone or computer, during a computer repair, a false personal ad, or other means.
  • These photos or videos are then posted on websites or sold for profit to humiliate, degrade, harass, physically endanger, or extort the victim.
Posting non-consensual pornography is a crime in 32 states as of 2013.
  • In California, Cal. Penal Code 647(j)(4) makes revenge porn a misdemeanor.
  • A perpetrator could end up with a fine and/or jail time.

Who May Be A Victim

While cyber exploitation affects both men and women, a study by the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative found that 90 percent of victims are women.
  • Women often face more serious consequences when they are the victim of non-consensual porn.
The same study from Cyber Civil Rights Initiative found:
  • 93% of victims (of all sexes) suffered significant emotional distress as a result of their victimization.
  • 51% had suicidal thoughts.
  • 49% stated they had been stalked or harassed online by users who saw their material.

If You Are A Victim

Do not immediately ask the individual or website to take the material down.
  • Make sure to save evidence of the photos being on the internet. Save a screenshot of the website. If the media is a video, download the video and save it. Also, save any emails or text messages regarding the picture or video.
  • Create an Evidence Chart detailing the date, what happened, the evidence, who you think did it, evidence they did it (such as a username, prior threats, etc.), what evidence is still needed (if applicable), and who has it.
Use the website’s policy to take down the picture or video.
  • If the website does not comply with taking the porn down, send a DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998) Takedown Form.
  • If the website still does not comply, consult an attorney for legal advice of other possible steps.
Register the pictures or videos with the U.S. Copyright Office to help protect yourself from future infringers.   Call the Crisis Helpline if you or a loved one have questions
  • 1-844-878-2274
 

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